Ivy Tech Community College, University of Southern Indiana partner for reverse transfer initiative

INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. – Ivy Tech Community College and the University of Southern Indiana (USI) have created a new statewide reverse transfer agreement for students who have transferred to USI prior to completing their associate degree at Ivy Tech.

To be eligible for the reverse transfer, students need to meet the following transfer policies and conditions:

  • Students will need at least 60 combined credit hours from USI and Ivy Tech
  • Students must have completed a minimum of 15 credit hours from Ivy Tech
  • Students must be a currently enrolled USI undergraduate
  • Students are not eligible for the program if they currently possess an associate degree or higher

“Offering students the ability to earn an associate degree through the reverse transfer opportunity creates a milestone on their educational journey. This credential may make them more marketable, keep motivated on their way toward a bachelor’s degree, and serve as a valuable asset should they be delayed in achieving their ultimate degree goal,” said Dr. Russ Baker, vice president of academic affairs and university transfer division, Ivy Tech Community College.

Ivy Tech Community College has partnered with other institutions to offer reverse transfer, including: Indiana State University, Purdue University, Ottawa University, University of Phoenix and Western Governors University.

“USI is excited to collaborate with Ivy Tech Community College on reverse transfer,” said Andrew Wright, vice president for enrollment management at USI. “Our goal is to make this process as simple as possible to assist former Ivy Tech students in attaining their associate degree as they work toward their bachelor’s degree here at USI.”

Under the agreement, USI will notify students who meet the minimum requirements to participate. For participating students, USI will submit all transcripts completed by eligible students to Ivy Tech for degree auditing. Ivy Tech will then report back to USI if the associate degree is conferred by sending an official, associate degree-posted transcript, and the USI degree audit will update to indicate the associate degree was earned.

About Ivy Tech Community College

 Ivy Tech Community College is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its community along with courses and programs that transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association.

About the University of Southern Indiana

Founded in 1965, the University of Southern Indiana enrolls more than 10,500 dual credit, undergraduate, graduate and doctoral students in more than 80 majors. A public higher education institution, located on a beautiful 1,400-acre campus in Evansville, Indiana, USI offers programs through the College of Liberal Arts, Romain College of Business, College of Nursing and Health Professions and the Pott College of Science, Engineering, and Education. USI is a Carnegie Foundation Community Engaged University and offers continuing education and special programs to more than 19,000 participants annually through Outreach and Engagement. USI is online at www.usi.edu.

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Ivy Tech Community College, University of Southern Indiana partner for reverse transfer initiative

Ivy Tech to Honor Area Fallen During Veterans Day Event

Terre Haute, Indiana –  Ivy Tech Community College Wabash Valley will join the Remembrance Day National Roll Call project to honor American service men and women in hosting simultaneous ceremonies across the nation on Veterans Day.

On Friday, Nov. 11, campus and community volunteers at 85 colleges and universities in 33 states across the nation will recognize the names of fallen.  Each campus has organized its own ceremony to recognize those who have served, are serving, and those who died in service to the nation. In Terre Haute, Jamie Hicks, a student who is a veteran, will read the names of the fallen soldiers from the Terre Haute area. All participating campuses will observe a simultaneous nationwide minute of silence at 11 a.m. Pacific Standard Time (2 p.m. on the Terre Haute campus EST).

The Remembrance Day National Roll Call is sponsored nationally by the Veterans Knowledge Community of NASPA Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education. NASPA is a 12,000-member association for the advancement, health, and sustainability of the student affairs professionals. The Veterans Knowledge Community (VKC) mission is to advocate for best practices to help student veterans’ transition to college and succeed. The National Roll Call began in 2011 to mark the 10th anniversary of the post 9-11 conflicts.

Dr. Brett Morris, a retired Army officer and the National Roll Call coordinator, said, “We want to rally campus communities across the nation to send a message to the troops currently serving – that we, as a national body of students, have not forgotten their sacrifices, or those of their fallen brethren.”

For information about the Ivy Tech Community College Wabash Valley Roll Call event, contact Jamie Newell at jnewell19@ivytech.edu.  To see a list of participating schools, visit va.eku.edu/rollcall.

 

Ivy Tech to Honor Area Fallen During Veterans Day Event

Ivy Tech Corporate College Recognized for Customized Training

As technology increases in the workforce, so too does the need for increased education.

Ivy Tech Corporate College has a variety of solutions – from weekly classes learning skills in computer technology to industry-related customized training for employers.

Recently, Corporate College was recognized for its customization of training and collaboration with WorkOne – to meet the needs of Computer Numerical Control (CNC) positions in the Wabash Valley.

Corporate College’s CNC Operator Program was recently selected as a finalist for the annual Exemplary Program Award for Noncredit Workforce Development Program from the National Council for Workforce Education.

NCWE recognized Ivy Tech Community College for successfully creating an intense educational package specifically designed to equip students with the tools to become National Institute of Metalworking Skills (NIMS) Certified CNC Operators, said Rod Dowell, account executive, for Corporate College Wabash Valley.

Ivy Tech utilizes a strategic, on-going partnership with the regional WorkOne office for recruitment and on-boarding of dislocated, underemployed as well as incumbent workers.  WorkOne also provides a funding stream for this program through state-appropriated funds.

There is an increasing need for viable CNC Operators, Dowell said. “Training for these operators is imperative to the future of many companies in the Wabash Valley.” An example of this need can be seen at Stark Industries (providing machining in aerospace, heavy industrial and medical).  Stark said at the beginning of the summer that there was an immediate need for an additional 25 CNC Operators for this summer alone, Dowell said.

“The need for machinists and CNC Operators is great in the Wabash Valley and the state of Indiana,” Dowell said. Businesses like Marion Tool and Stark Industries all produce industry leading parts and products for high end applications like jet engines. “This type of Advanced Manufacturing is a key to the success of the Wabash Valley economic situation. The more students we can get involved and interested in this type of work, the better prepared we will be to meet the need and growing demands of the machining industry.”

Ivy Tech’s planning with WorkOne and industry partners, have developed a CNC Operator training program educating workers in all aspects of CNC machine operation and setup methods while providing hands-on training. In lab exercises, each student gains valuable experience with general purpose hand tools, machine tooling, measurement and layout equipment, turning, milling, and grinding, Dowell said.

Ivy Tech and the Wabash Valley regional WorkOne have created a process for both on-boarding and funding for this program.  This CNC program has been reviewed and approved for Work Indiana funding by the Indiana Department of Workforce Development.

Dowell explained the process:  Dislocated workers are screened by WorkOne staff utilizing the WorkKeys test, drug screening, as well as one-on-one interviews per the request of industry partners.  Once the potential student has passed all the required pre-screening and the desire for this type of work is determined, the student information is forwarded to Ivy Tech for registration into this training program.

Ten separate cohorts of 48 students, with 225 contact hours each, have moved through this entire process to successfully complete the training.  During the course’s history there has been a 98% completion rate for NIMS certification and  98% of Ivy Tech students have been placed with area businesses or have moved on to further their education at Ivy Tech.

The next CNC Operator training course will be September 20 – December 9.  For more information or to register, contact Amy Akers at (812) 298-2485 or aakers@ivytech.edu.

Ivy Tech Corporate College Recognized for Customized Training

Ivy Tech Corporate College Fall Training Classes Starting Soon

The Ivy Tech Corporate College will begin its fall Microsoft Office 2013 and CPR training classes starting August 23, 2016. The Microsoft Office courses (3.5 hours) that are offered include Word, Excel, Access, PowerPoint and Project. Both First Aid CPR (3 hours) and Healthcare Provider CPR (4 hours) classes are available.

Your company can only succeed when it has employees with the right knowledge and skills allowing the company to perform at its best. That makes education and professional development training among the most critical investments you can make in your business. Ivy Tech Corporate College can help you succeed!

Below is a list of the training classes offered this fall:

Microsoft 2013 Word

Level 1-           August 23, 2016 or October 4, 2016

Level 2-           August 30, 2016 or October 11, 2016

Level 3-           September 6, 2016 or October 18, 2016

Microsoft 2013 Excel

Level 1-           August 25, 2016 or October 13, 2016

Level 2-           September 1, 2016 or October 20, 2016

Level 3-           September 8, 2016 or October 27, 2016

Microsoft 2013 Access

Level 1-           September 13, 2016 or October 25, 2016

Level 2-           September 20, 2016 or November 1, 2016

Level 3-           September 27, 2016 or November 8, 2016

Microsoft 2013 PowerPoint

Level 1-           September 15, 2016 or November 3, 2016

Level 2-           September 22, 2016 or November 10, 2016

Microsoft 2013 Project

Level 1-           September 29, 2016 or November 15, 2016

Level 2-           October 6, 2016 or November 22, 2016

 

CPR – First Aid

Available on request

CPR – Healthcare provider

August 24, 2016 – 5:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.

To sign up or for additional information, contact Amy Akers at (812) 298-2485 or aakers@ivytech.edu.

Ivy Tech Corporate College Fall Training Classes Starting Soon

Ivy Tech Students’ First Harvest of Sweet Corn

On Tuesday, July 26, Ivy Tech students and faculty will be harvesting nearly 30 rows of sweet corn that were planted by students to not only give Ivy Tech Agriculture students hands-on experiences; but also to be used in a local, regional and state-wide project – providing fresh produce to feed families who don’t always have access to quality, nutritious food.

The harvest is taking place as part of Ivy Inspire – a program where Ivy Tech employees and students regularly participate in giving back to the community.

The equipment used in this project is the latest in precision agriculture with GPS capability including auto steer, split row planting capabilities, computer monitor/display, planting software, etc.  These precision agriculture additions to Ivy Tech’s tractor, allow precise and accurate planting, the ability to track planting of hybrid seed and software to manage yield calculations at time of harvest, among other benefits.

In this project students have a chance to take part in a meaningful experience outside of their normal lives by growing a field crop that can be eaten directly by humans, and helping the community at the same time.

Working closely with Catholic Charities, Wabash Valley Master Gardeners, Ivy Tech Community College, Westminster Village and a variety of other partners, the sweet corn will be distributed to food pantries across the Wabash Valley.  In addition to Wabash Valley locations, Catholic Charities will work with its statewide partners to share any additional remaining product.

Ivy Tech Students’ First Harvest of Sweet Corn

Ivy Tech Community College Students Win National Competition

Five students who are studying at Ivy Tech Community College Wabash Valley, used classroom-earned knowledge and field experience to win the North American Colleges and Teachers of Agriculture (NACTA) Soil Judging Competition at the University of Minnesota-Crookston. More than 1,000 students from across the nation participated in the NACTA competition in a variety of contests.

The winning team members are:

  • Cody Kosinki, from Clinton, IN
  • Anthony Stowe, from Rockville, IN
  • Dalton Lewis, from Linton, IN
  • Lindsey Jones, from Terre Haute, IN
  • Robin Stover, from Marshall, IL

John Rosene, agriculture program chair at Ivy Tech, said that knowledge of soils and soil characteristics is very useful for agriculture producers, but also in a variety of careers such as landscaping, custom application, site inspection for septic systems and more. “Soils are the foundation of agriculture as well as all kinds of construction, from residential to road construction.  This contest allows students to see soils in unique places and evaluate them for crop productivity and other uses,” Rosene said.  This year’s contest was held in an area that was once an ancient lake bed and featured heavy clay soils interspersed with sandy beach ridges. The primary crop grown in northwestern Minnesota is sugar beets. “We teach students about the origin and characteristics of varied soil types, but until you see something like this, it’s hard to really get a feel for a soil that doesn’t occur anywhere in our area” added Rosene.

At the competition, he said students had the opportunity for intense practice for three days prior to the competition in pits dug around the city. Rosene and Coach Brandon Hall, a former soil judge, attended the competition with the students.

The actual competition was at a location kept secret until the day of the contest.  Students were divided into groups, and under controlled conditions, evaluated the soils for texture, structure, color and drainage. The students then judged the soils for their application to agricultural production and engineering uses.

Rosene said Ivy Tech Community College Wabash Valley began competing in 2010, and has placed in the Top 3, five times.  “We’ve been very successful, however, this is the first time we’ve come in first.”

Ivy Tech Community College Students Win National Competition

Ivy Tech Precision Agriculture Students and Alumni Plant Sweet Corn; To Feed Area’s Hungry

Ivy Tech students, faculty, and alumni today (6-7-16) completed a third and final planting of sweet corn on the Ivy Tech Agriculture Plot off Davis Drive, that has not only presented Ivy Tech students the opportunity to be involved in a local, regional and state-wide project – but also will help to feed families who don’t always have access to quality, nutritious food, said Ivy Tech Chancellor Jonathan Weinzapfel.

“We are proud to be able to offer Ivy Tech students the opportunity to not only learn about precision agriculture – one of the fastest growing fields of study with the potential to make farming more efficient and profitable – but to also encourage the growth of students’ humanity and compassion, by being a part of a project to feed the hungry,” Weinzapfel said. Working closely with Catholic Charities, Wabash Valley Master Gardeners, Ivy Tech Community College, Westminster Village and a variety of other partners, when harvested later this summer, the sweet corn will be distributed to food pantries across the Wabash Valley.  In addition to Wabash Valley locations, Catholic Charities will work with its statewide partners to share any additional remaining product

David Will, dean of the School of Technology, said the equipment used in this project is the latest in precision agriculture with GPS capability including auto steer, split row planting capabilities, computer monitor/display, planting software, etc.  “These precision agriculture additions to Ivy Tech’s New Holland tractor, allow precise and accurate planting, the ability to track planting of hybrid seed and software to manage yield calculations at time of harvest, among other benefits,” he said.

He pointed to the many that have helped or been a part of this project including Ivy Tech Alumnus Justin McKain, Bane Welker precision ag specialist – who not only planted the first round of corn with loaned Bane Welker equipment – but who also was a trouble shooter along the way. Ceres Solutions provided the fertilizer and crop protection chemicals and Syngenta Seeds provide sweet corn seed.

Becky Miller, executive director of resource development for Ivy Tech Wabash Valley, said the idea for this project was birthed several years ago as Ivy Tech looked for an opportunity to establish a community learning garden – and a way to expand these types of educational opportunities across academic programs. Westminster Village had 6 acres of land they were managing and through discussions, gave it to Ivy Tech to use. “What developed, is what we are experiencing today,” Miller said.

Because 22 acres close to the Agriculture Program’s home at the Center for Workforce Development was procured to use as an outdoor lab for Precision Agriculture Equipment Technology and Ag programs – the Westminster plot was freed up to do this sweet corn project, Will said. “John Rosene, Ivy Tech’s Agriculture program chair, developed the idea to use this amazing resource to feed the hungry in our community. We quickly realized that 6 acres of sweet corn will yield about 150,000 ears of corn and we would need help with distribution. Our community partnerships will be vital to ensure the corn feeds as many Hoosiers as possible with little to no waste.”

“The sweet corn project is an opportunity for students to experience agriculture in a way that isn’t possible in a classroom, or even traditional field experience,” Rosene said. “Some aspects of the project relate directly to the subjects we teach every day like soil science, crop production, agricultural economics and ag mechanics.” But, he said, the majority of applications of those concepts are with commodity crops like field corn, soybeans, and wheat. “This project allows students to gain experience in growing a specialty crop on a large scale – and evaluate the pros and cons from a management and economic perspective.”

Rosene said not only did students help with the third planting of sweet corn today – but they have been involved in soil sampling to analyze the soil test results and to calculate fertilizer recommendations; were involved in the seedbed preparation prior to planting; and will be involved in the harvest of the sweet corn later this summer. “We will also utilize the plot as a field crop scouting tool in the fall, as well as an opportunity for students to gain experience in planting cover crops once the sweet corn has been harvested,” Rosene said.

Ivy Tech Precision Agriculture Students and Alumni Plant Sweet Corn; To Feed Area’s Hungry